William Unek
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William Unek

William Unek was an African police constable and mass murderer who killed a total of 57 people in two separate spree killings three years apart. His ... More »William Unek was an African police constable and mass murderer who killed a total of 57 people in two separate spree killings three years apart. His first murder spree occurred near Mahagi, Belgian Congo in 1954, where he killed 21 people with an axe, before escaping and finally ending up in Tanganyika. Apparently because of social misunderstandings with his boss, Unek went on a second rampage which began in the early hours of February 11, 1957. Armed with a stolen police rifle, 50 rounds of ammunition and an axe, he started killing people in the area of Malampaka, a village about 40 miles southeast of Mwanza. Within twelve hours Unek shot dead ten men, eight women and eight children, murdered five more men with the axe, stabbed another one, burned two women and a child and strangled a 15-year-old girl, thus killing a total of 36 people, before fleeing. For nine days Unek was sought by Wasukuma tribesmen, police, and eventually a company of the King's African Rifles in Tanganyika's... [ Wikipedia ]

Mass Shootings Have Long History : Discovery News

Between 1954 and 1957, William Unek murdered a total of 57 people in two separate spree killings in the Belgian Congo. He first killed 21 people with an axe, then shot dead ten men, eight women and eight children, slaughtered six more men with the axe, burned two women and a child, and ...

Mass killings happen more often in areas with strict gun control laws

William Unek murdered 21 people with an axe in the Belgian Congo in 1954. He escaped to Tanganyika where he went on another rampage three years later, this time using a rifle as well as an axe to kill 36 people. In Europe there have been a surprising number of mass shootings in the past ...

Liberals, Guns, and Urban Legend

Between 1954 and 1957, William Unek murdered a total of 57 people in two separate spree killings in the Belgian Congo. He first killed 21 people with an axe, then shot dead ten men, eight women and eight children, slaughtered six more men with the axe, burned two women and a child, and ...

Gun control may make shooting sprees worse

William Unek murdered 21 people with an axe in the Belgian Congo in 1954. He escaped to Tanganyika where he went on another rampage three years later, this time using a rifle as well as an axe to kill 36 people. In Europe there have been a surprising number of mass shootings in the past ...

This American Darkness

Nor did William Unek in Africa. Brazil, Nepal, South Africa, China, Germany, Finland, India, Israel, Russia, Canada—they've all had them. For decades, men have randomly gone on rage-fueled killing sprees. We try to analyze them afterward to make some sense of them and protect ourselves. ...

Mass killings are not new and are becoming commonplace

Going back to 1954, William Unek who was an African police constable, went. on two killing sprees. The first one near Mahagi, the Belgian Congo where the killed 21 people with an axe. He then escaped and went to Tanganyika. Then on February 11, 1957, he reportedly became angered with his ...

Blog: Mass Murder A Modern Curse? Hardly.

William Unek killed 21 people with an axe before escaping. Three years later, on February 11, 1957, he went on another killing spree with a stolen police rifle and killed 36 more in Mwanza. May 4, 1956 -- Prince George's Co., MD. A student killed his teacher and injured two others after ...

Friday Afternoon Roundup

Two of the killers, William Unek in the Belgian Congo and Woo Bum-Kon of South Korea were police officers. The United States homicide rate doubled between the 1900s and the 1920s. It declined in the wartime and post-war period when most immigrants had been successfully integrated and it ...

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